Overview of GRI indicators

Overview of GRI indicators

 

Vision and strategy

Vision and strategy
Indicator   Comment
1.1 Statement from the most senior decision-maker of the organization. See: Foreword.
1.2 Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities. See: How we create value, Value chain. (Risk analysis: Risks and opportunities table).

Organisational profile

Organisational profile
Indicator   Comment
2.1 Name of the organization. The legal name of Vodafone Netherlands is Vodafone Libertel B.V.
2.2 Primary brands, products, and/or services. See: Who we are and The easiest place to do business.
2.3 Operational structure of the organization, including main divisions, operating companies, subsidiaries, and joint ventures. See: Who we are and Management, 1st paragraph.
2.4 Location of organization's headquarters. See: Credits.
2.5 Number of countries where the organization operates, and names of countries with either major operations or that are specifically relevant to the sustainability issues covered in the report. Vodafone Netherlands only operates in the Netherlands.
2.6 Nature of ownership and legal form. See: Management, 1st paragraph.
2.7 Markets served (including geographic breakdown, sectors served, and types of customers/beneficiaries). See: Who we are.
2.8 Scale of the reporting organization. See: Who we are and A great place to work (table of HR figures) and Key figures & result, Financial.
2.9 Significant changes during the reporting period regarding size, structure, or ownership. See: Organisational developments in Who we are section.
2.10 Awards received in the reporting period. See: A Playful and Connected Brand.

Report parameters

Report parameters
Indicator   Comment
3.1 Reporting period (e.g., fiscal/calendar year) for information provided. 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013
3.2 Date of most recent previous report (if any). 30 July 2012
3.3 Reporting cycle (annual, biennial, etc.) Annual
3.4 Contact point for questions regarding the report or its contents. E: samenleving.nl@vodafone.com, T: 043 3555555.
3.5 Process for defining report content. See: About this report and How we create value.
3.6 Boundary of the report (e.g., countries, divisions, subsidiaries, leased facilities, joint ventures, suppliers). See GRI Boundary Protocol for further guidance. See: About this report.
3.7 State any specific limitations on the scope or boundary of the report (see completeness principle for explanation of scope). See: About this report.
3.8 Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations, and other entities that can significantly affect comparability from period to period and/or between organizations. Vodafone Retail BV and Telespectrum.
3.9 Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations, including assumptions and techniques underlying estimations applied to the compilation of the Indicators and other information in the report. Explain any decisions not to apply, or to substantially diverge from, the GRI Indicator Protocols. See: About this report.
3.10 Explanation of the effect of any re-statements of information provided in earlier reports, and the reasons for such re-statement (e.g.,mergers/acquisitions, change of base years/periods, nature of business, measurement methods). See: About this report and footnotes to Key figures & results.
3.11 Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the scope, boundary, or measurement methods applied in the report. See: About this report.
3.12 Table identifying the location of the Standard Disclosures in the report. See: Contents (and website).
3.13 Policy and current practice with regard to seeking external assurance for the report. See: About this report.

Governance, commitments and engagement

Governance, commitments and engagement
Indicator   Comment
4.1 Governance structure of the organization, including committees under the highest governance body responsible for specific tasks, such as setting strategy or organizational oversight. See: Management and Organisation chart.
4.2 Indicate whether the Chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer. Rob Shuter (with effect from 1 April 2012)
4.3 For organizations that have a unitary board structure, state the number of members of the highest governance body that are independent and/or non-executive members.

N/A

4.4 Mechanisms for shareholders and employees to provide recommendations or direction to the highest governance body.

See: Management, box: Power to you: employee co-determination.

General Meeting of Shareholders: there is a right of recommendation relating to the appointment of new supervisory directors and, on the basis of the Articles of Association, a “general” right of instruction: Article 14.1: “The board must act in accordance with the instructions of the general meeting with regard to the general lines of the financial, social, economic and personnel policy to be pursued.”

4.5 Linkage between compensation for members of the highest governance body, senior managers, and executives (including departure arrangements), and the organization's performance (including social and environmental performance).

Within the framework of issue, reputation and stakeholder management all business units have a target related to this. It is not known what percentage of compensation is dependent on this.
See: Management, Embedding sustainability within the organisation.

4.6 Processes in place for the highest governance body to ensure conflicts of interest are avoided.

The conflict of interest regulations as currently laid down by law apply to the board of Vodafone Netherlands. The following processes and codes are intended to prevent conflicts of  interest: The Articles of Association, code of conduct (including anti-corruption and anti-bribery regulations), Sarbanes Oxley, performance of audits by Group Internal Audit, Delegation of Authorities (sets clear guidelines for every part of the company indicating when approval is necessary or when certain persons need to be consulted. Certain activities are restricted to certain roles or groups of individuals and only people who belong to these groups are authorised to perform these activities, in accordance with the policy in force).      
The Vodafone Group sends a questionnaire on conflicts of interest to each member of the Board of Directors every year.

4.7 Process for determining the qualifications and expertise of the members of the highest governance body for guiding the organization's strategy on economic, environmental, and social topics.

The Corporate Governance section of the Articles of Association describes the authorities and responsibilities that apply under the Articles of Association. The Board of Directors is responsible for, amongst other things, monitoring issues relating to legal matters, regulations, government policy and health and safety, and must ensure that the company complies with laws and regulations. The Board of Directors must also ensure that implementation instructions received from the Meeting of Shareholders concerning financial, social and economic policy and human resources management are acted on. The business principles (code of conduct) serve as a guideline for controlling the organisation. These describe, amongst other things, what is expected with regard to the environment, employees, health and safety, local communities and society.
See: indicator 4.5 and indicator 4.9.

4.8 Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes of conduct, and principles relevant to economic, environmental, and social performance and the status of their implementation.

See: How we create value, Strategy; Management, box: The basis for our management and policy.
Further information on our business principles, policy and codes can be found at www.vodafone.nl and www.vodafone.com.

Business Principles (code of conduct) and whistle-blower procedure
Privacy policy
Ethical purchasing code
Health & safety
Product safety & assurance
Responsible roll-out of the network
Security
Anti-corruption and anti-bribery
Charitable donations
Employee rights
Financial policy
Corporate gifts and hospitality
Corporate gifts and hospitality
Communication
Brand
Compliance with regulations

Policy documents are binding and non-negotiable. The policy of the Vodafone Group forms the basis for the management and policy of Vodafone Netherlands. This policy applies to all employees, but can be given more detail at local level. In the Netherlands it is the Chief Executive Officer's responsibility to implement the policy, to make sure that it is understood and observed and to ensure that it is not in conflict with other local policy.

4.9 Procedures of the highest governance body for overseeing the organization's identification and management of economic, environmental, and social performance, including relevant risks and opportunities, and adherence or compliance with internationally agreed standards, codes of conduct, and principles.

See: Management, Embedding sustainability within the organisation.
See: indicator 4.8
The ethical purchasing code forms part of the contract with suppliers. In this code we refer to internationally recognised social standards of the ILO (International Labour Organisation), the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
See: Code of conduct.

4.10 Processes for evaluating the highest governance body's own performance, particularly with respect to economic, environmental, and social performance. See: Management, Embedding sustainability within the organisation.
See: How we create value, Ready for the future: table of KPIs 2012/2013 and 2013/2014
4.11 Explanation of whether and how the precautionary approach or principle is addressed by the organization. See: How we create value: Value chain: Risk analysis.
See: Management: Effective issue, risk and crisis management.
4.12 Externally developed economic, environmental, and social charters, principles, or other initiatives to which the organization subscribes or endorses.
  • Long-term energy-efficiency agreements (MJA3), agreements between the government and companies, institutions and municipalities on more effective and efficient energy use. The agreement was signed in November 2010 for the period 2009-2012. A new plan has been submitted for the period 2013-2016.  
  • CIO Energy Efficiency Agreement (CIO Platform NL).
  • Talent to the Top’ charter. Via this charter we have been bound, since May 2011, to the target of increasing the number of women in top management positions within our company (GMT/SMT) by 50% within the space of five years.
  • The 'Be the change' manifesto, which was signed in 2010 within the framework of our membership of MVO Nederland [CSR Netherlands], describes 10 principles of sustainable business.
  • SMS Code of Conduct and Code of Conduct for Paid Mobile Internet Services of Stichting SMS-Gedragscode [SMS Code of Conduct Foundation], a joint initiative of all parties involved in offering SMS services and mobile services in the Netherlands.
  • Netherlands Advertising Code of the Advertising Code Committee. This sets out the rules with which advertisements must comply. The rules have been drawn up in consultation with parties who make up the advertising industry (advertisers, advertising consultancies and the media).
  • Agreement of the Customer Service Federation (KSF). The signatories have undertaken to communicate transparently about the key quality parameters in the area of customer service
  • Code of Conduct on Transparent Mobile Data Costs. Drawn up together by the mobile operators to prevent bill shocks
  • Code of Conduct on Transparent Internet Speeds. Drawn up together by the fixed and mobile internet providers.
  • We respect and comply with all legislation and standards in the area of human rights in the countries in which we operate; see the code of conduct.
  • In our ethical purchasing code we refer to internationally recognised social standards of the ILO (International Labour Organisation), the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
4.13 Memberships in associations Platform Internetveiligheid [Internet Security Platform] of ECP-EPN, MVO Nederland [CSR Netherlands], VNO NCW, Nederland ICT, Monet, Telecom ISAC, The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the National Coordinator for Counterterrorism and Security (NCTV).
4.14 List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization. See: How we create value: External environment (Stakeholder overview table).
4.15 Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage.

See: How we create value: External environment (Stakeholder overview table).
See: Management, Stakeholder management.
Identification is based on individual discussions, research, publications and expertise.

4.16 Approaches to stakeholder engagement, including frequency of engagement by type and by stakeholder group.

See: How we create value: External environment (Stakeholder overview table).
See: An improved and leading reputation: How do we achieve our results?
See: Management: Stakeholder management.

4.17 Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement, and how the organization has responded to those key topics and concerns, including through its reporting. See: How we create value: External environment (Stakeholder overview table + Materiality matrix)
See: An improved and leading reputation: How do we achieve our results?
See: A great place to work: Results of the employee satisfaction survey.
See: Performance, "What have we done well?", "What can we do better?" and "What do our stakeholders think?"

Management approach

Management approach
Indicator Comment  
Economics
Aspects Economic performance See: Financial performance.
See: How we create value: External environment, Market developments + Ready for the future.
  Market presence

See: Financial performance.
See: How we create value: External environment, Market developments + Ready for the future.

  Indirect economic impacts See: Financial performance.
See: How we create value: External enviroment, Market developments and Social developments + Ready for the future.
Environment
Aspects Materials See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).
  Energy See: Building for the Future.
See: How we creat value, Ready for the future.
See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).
  Water

See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).

  Biodiversity

See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).

  Emissions, effluents and waste See: Building for the Future.
See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).
  Products and services See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).
  Compliance

See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).

  Transport

See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).

  Overall

See: Policy on responsible roll-out of the network.
See: Social responsibility policy, which states that we must comply with relevant policy and national and international legislation and regulations relating to social, environmental and ethical issues (internal document).

Labour conditions
Aspects Employment See: A great place to work.
  Labour/management relations See: A great place to work.
  Occupational health and safety

See: A great place to work.

The same health & safety rules apply to all Vodafone offices worldwide.  The Global Health, Safety and Well-being Team (the head of Global HS&W reports to the Vodafone Group Human Resources Director) is responsible for strategy, governance and monitoring. Ultimate responsibility for HS&W at Vodafone NL lies with the CEO of Vodafone Netherlands and the Board of Directors. Line managers are responsible for the health, safety and well-being of their employees and those who are affected by it. They must be confident that adequate systems have been put in place in accordance with Vodafone Group policy and standards and that Dutch legislation and regulations are being complied with.

See: indicator LA6

  Training and education See: A great place to work.
A training budget is determined annually. Part of this is for job-related training within departmental budgets and part for non-job-related training within the HR budget.
  Diversity and equal opportunity See: A great place to work.
Human rights
Aspects Investment and procurement practices

See: Management: Chain management.
See: Building for the future, Chain management.
See: The ethical purchasing code.
The ethical purchasing code forms part of the contract with suppliers. In this code we refer to internationally recognised social standards of the ILO (International Labour Organisation), the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. All major international suppliers are asked to use e-tasc (Electronics - Tool for Accountable Supply Chains). This is an online system which is used to carry out an initial risk assessment, possibly followed by a more detailed self-assessment depending on the outcome. 

With regard to responsible chain management, Vodafone Netherlands falls under the overarching policy of the Vodafone Group, where virtually all joint purchasing is carried out. The approach for dealing with suppliers who fail to adhere to the code of conduct and ethical purchasing code is characterised by collaboration and improvement. New suppliers are required to comply with our codes from the start of our collaboration. Further information on our policy can be found on the website of the Vodafone Group (under the headings ‘Strengthening sustainability criteria for supplier qualification’ and ‘Driving improvements through supplier assessments’).
See also the ethical purchasing code, under the heading ‘Corrective action’.

  Non-discrimination Contained in the ethical purchasing code and the code of conduct.
  Freedom of association and collective bargaining

Contained in the ethical purchasing code. All purchasers have been trained in relation to this policy.

  Child labor

Contained in the ethical purchasing code. All purchasers have been trained in relation to this policy.

  Forced and compulsory labor

Contained in the ethical purchasing code. All purchasers have been trained in relation to this policy.

  Complaints and Grievance Practices

There is a whistle-blower scheme/speak-up policy for employees who suspect that someone is not adhering to the code of conduct. They can also file a report anonymously. This is explained in the code of conduct. The ethical purchasing code states as follows: Duty to Report - Vodafone operates a whistle-blowing mechanism under its Duty to Report Policy. It is the duty of our suppliers, contractors and employees to report dishonesty, corruption, fraud, labour and human rights concerns, environmental damage or any other unethical behaviour; either directly to our Group Corporate Security team +44 (0) 1635 667911, or via an independent third party on +44 (0)1249 661 795. All reports are dealt with in confidence.

  Security practices See: Management: Security.
See: Building for the future: Security.
  Indigenous rights N/A
Community
Aspects Community See: SO1 and PR1 for radiation from transmitter masts.
See: A great Place to work for what employees do for society.
See: Building for the future for social projects.
See: The code of conduct.
  Corruption

See: The code of conduct and also Indicator SO3: there is a zero-tolerance policy relating to bribery and there are regulations on giving and receiving (customer) gifts and invitations to events that apply to all employees.
In 2010 the entire senior management team followed an online training programme on corruption. In addition, in 2011 they received regular information on the amendments to the code of conduct and guidelines. Communications relating to anti-bribery measures were circulated again in 2012. The policy was also amended and a new gift register was implemented.
There is a whistle-blower scheme/speak-up policy for employees who suspect that someone is not adhering to the code of conduct. They can also file a report anonymously. Attention was drawn to this once again in 2012.
The policy was also amended. The registration requirements were changed and a new gift register was implemented. This register is now an online tool in which employees can record the gifts and invitations they receive (or give). Online training on the subject of corruption has also been made available to employees, in both Dutch and English.

  Public policy  See: The code of conduct.
See: Our policy.
  Anti-competitive behavior See: The code of conduct.
  Compliance See: The code of conduct and ethical purchasing code.
Product responsibility
Aspects Customer health and safety
 
See: radiation and health for more information.
  Product and service labelling The eco-score is available for mobile phones.
  Marketing communications See: A playful and connected brand.
  Customer privacy

See: An improved and leading reputation.
Within Vodafone we have agreed on privacy principles. These principles apply to all employees within each Vodafone company. They have been developed into concrete policy rules and rules of conduct and incorporated into certain business processes, such as purchasing and product and service development. By means of online training, workshops and privacy campaigns, etc. we also teach our employees how to put our privacy policy into practice in their everyday work.
Privacy aspects play a role in almost all our business activities: when you come to us to find a suitable subscription, when you take out a subscription, when you are connected to the network as a new customer, when you pay a bill, during contact with our customer service team and in our marketing campaigns. To ensure that our privacy policy is applied consistently, we have set up a multidisciplinary privacy team. This privacy team reports directly to the board and the Global Privacy Team. Day-to-day coordination of our privacy policy is the responsibility of a Privacy Officer.

  Compliance See: The code of conduct and ethical purchasing code.

Economics

Economic
Indicator Comment  
Economic performance
EC1 Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments. See: Key figures and results.
See: Foreword by CEO + Supervisory Board.
EC2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization's activities due to climate change.

Water damage to base stations due to flooding.
Network quality due to heavy rain.
Extreme storms can cause mobile transmitter masts that are connected via a radio link to fail, as was the case in Limburg in 2011.
Higher costs due to rising energy prices.
The potential costs have not been quantified.
See also indicator 1.2.
See: How we create value, External inviroment: Social developments table (Climate change)

EC3 Coverage of the organization's defined benefit plan obligations.

Vodafone Netherlands has a defined contribution pension plan. The questions about the coverage of the obligations do not apply. The percentage of the salary that is deducted for the pension depends on the age of the employees, based on the requirements of pension and tax legislation. There is 100% participation in the pension plans.

EC4 Significant financial assistance received from government. None
Market presence
EC5 Range of ratios of standard entry level wage compared to local minimum wage at significant locations of operation.

Average current salary of all employees: € 3,603.69 per month.
Lowest starting salary at Vodafone Netherlands: € 1,480.28 per month.
Minimum wage in the Netherlands: € 1,469.40 per month.

EC6 Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locations of operation.

Vodafone does not have an official policy aimed at encouraging purchasing from local suppliers. Nevertheless, in 2012/2013 we made purchases from Dutch suppliers with a value in excess of € 200 million.

EC7 Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community at significant locations of operation.

See: A great place to work (table of HR figures) and the additional table of HR figures.
To ensure that we are regarded as an attractive employer in the Maastricht region, we have joined the Customer Service Valley. By taking this step, we are keen to position Vodafone as a strong customer service organisation to help us attract the best employees in the region.
We also hire people of various nationalities. This can be seen from our recruitment of trainees, for example, around 20% of whom have a nationality other than Dutch.
As at 31 March 2013 the Board of Directors consisted of five Dutch members and four members with a different nationality.
On the same date 85% of our senior managers were Dutch and 15% had a different nationality.   

Indirect economic impacts
EC8 Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement. See: Foreword by CEO + Supervisory Board.
See: Who we are, Organisational developments.
See: How we create value: External enviroment, Market developments + Value chain + Ready for the future.
See: Building of the future.
EC9 Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts. See: Foreword by CEO + Supervisory Board.

Environment

Environment
Indicator Comment  
Materials
EN1 Materials used by weight or volume.

See key figures Building for the future, the pop-up CO2 footprint under pillar Building for the future and the results of mobile working under A great place to work.
33,900 kg of paper, including BelCompany.

EN2 Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials. See shortage of raw materials and e-waste under social developments
Marketing materials: 100% FSC paper.
Energy
EN3 Direct energy consumption by primary energy source in joules or multiples of joules (for example gigajoules) 953,827 GJ
EN4 Indirect energy consumption by primary source. Not known
EN5 Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvements.

See: Building for the future.
2,080,026 kwh in the telephone exchanges. Our offices, shops and antennas consumed more energy. This can be attributed to the acquisitions of BelCompany and Telespectrum and the rise in data consumption. Vodafone's production actually increased. This resulted in energy efficiency of -0.05%. 

EN6 Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives.

See: Building for the future, Enviroment.
Single RAN.
Switch reduction.
Mobile working.
New cooling for switches.
New transformer buildings.
Power back-up and power boosters.
1800 GSM indoor switch-off.
Smart metering for 200 access installations.
Wind turbine on transmitter masts.

EN7 Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption and reductions achieved.  
Emissions, effluents and waste
EN16 Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight. 52.2 ktonnes (scope 1 and 2)
See: Building for the future; CO2 footprint table.
EN17 Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight. 0
See: Building for the future; CO2 footprint table.
EN18 Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved. See: Building for the future; Environment.
EN19 Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight. 0.394
See: Building for the future; CO2 footprint table.
EN22 Total weight of waste by type and disposal method.

32,040 kg of batteries with acid, eural [European List of Waste] code 0506017, processing method A.01.
45,736 kg of paper recycled.
14,830 kg of working mobile phones collected for reuse or recycling.
438 kg of broken mobile phones collected for recycling.
5,515 kg of old mobile phone stock given up for reuse.
66,500 kg of network equipment reused.
182,193 kg of network equipment recycled.

EN24 Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationally. 32,040 kg of batteries with acid, eural [European List of Waste] code 0506017, processing method A.01.
Products and services
EN26 Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation.

Handset recycling and reuse, sale of SIM ONLY (39.81% SIM-only consumers, incl. Hollandsnieuwe), paperless billing (93.8%).

EN27 Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category. 0%
Compliance
EN28 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations. 0
Transport
EN29 Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organization's operations, and transporting members of the workforce.

2,010,398 km by air.               
1,636,663 km by road.
2,009,679 km by public transport.

Overall
EN30 Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type. € 63,000 of green energy purchased in the form of GroenGarant certificates from Nuon.

Labour conditions

Labour conditions
Indicator Comment  
Employment
LA1 Total workforce by employment type, employment contract, and region. See: A great place to work (see table of HR figures) and the additional table of HR figures.
LA2 Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender, and region. See: A great place to work (see table of HR figures) and the additional table of HR figures.
LA3 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations. The employment conditions apply to full-time, part-time and temporary contracts. In a number of cases (within Customer Management) the employment conditions also apply to agency workers.
Labor/management relations
LA4 Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements. 0% (the company has its own arrangements and there is no collective bargaining agreement).
LA5 Minimum notice period(s) regarding significant operational changes, including whether it is specified in collective agreements. Depending on the type of organisational change, the WC will need to be informed in certain cases. We do not have any fixed guidelines relating to implementation times/deadlines. The periods vary from a few months to a few days.
Occupational health and safety
LA6 Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programs.

1.74% of employees are involved in occupational health and safety programmes: The risk inventory and evaluation revealed that we had too few company emergency response team members. Partly as a result of the New World of Work ("Het nieuwe werken"), etc., last year we therefore trained more VF colleagues (on a voluntary basis) as company emergency response team members, including Facilicom/Trigion employees.

In Capelle a/d IJssel we will be training 7 new colleagues as company emergency response team members. For each of the locations mentioned above we have also now appointed a location coordinator for the company emergency response team. This person takes care of the day-to-day management of the team in his/her building.              
There is one prevention employee, who is responsible for the identification of occupational health and safety risks, an action plan for mitigating risks and the annual evaluation. The prevention employee reports to the property manager.
There is a health, safety, welfare & environment committee, which forms part of the WC and is made up of three employees.

Eindhoven 9
Veenendaal 9
Maastricht 25
Amsterdam 15
Hollandse Nieuwe (ODE) 5
Total 63
LA7 Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region. Sickness absence was 3.52% excluding pregnancies and 3.62% including pregnancies.        
There were no work-related fatalities.
LA9 Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions. None
Training and education
LA10 Average hours of training per year per employee by employee category.

We do not have a standard number of hours for people who follow training programmes. A training budget is determined annually. Part of this is for job-related training within departmental budgets and part for non-job-related training within the HR budget.
€ 2,638,666.78 was spent on training in 2012/2013. Last year 80% of our managers took part in workshops to improve their performance management skills.

LA12 Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews. Every employee (100%) receives one formal appraisal per year and two reviews per year (mid-year and end of year). In addition, managers regularly hold bilateral consultations with their employees.
Diversity and equal opportunity
LA13 Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity. See: A great place to work (see table of HR figures).
See: Management, Organisation chart for Board of Directors and Supervisory Board.
LA14 Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category.
  M avg. V avg. Ratio
GMT 18,850 20,000 0.9425
E 12,399 10,829 1.144981
F 7,036 7,056 0.997166
G-band 3,469 2,792 1.242479

Human rights

Human rights
Indicator Comment  
Investment and procurement practices
HR1 Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements that include human rights clauses or that have undergone human rights screening.

The ethical purchasing code forms part of the contract with suppliers. In this code we refer to internationally recognised social standards of the ILO (International Labour Organisation), the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. This means that 100% of contracts with suppliers contain clauses on human rights, in the form of the ethical purchasing code, as part of the contract. Together with our 12 handset suppliers we are involved in international programmes aimed at safeguarding human rights and improving working conditions.
With regard to responsible chain management, Vodafone Netherlands falls under the overarching policy of the Vodafone Group, where virtually all joint purchasing is carried out. The approach for dealing with suppliers who fail to adhere to the code of conduct and ethical purchasing code is characterised by collaboration and improvement. New suppliers are required to comply with our codes from the start of our collaboration. Further information on our policy can be found on the website of the Vodafone Group (under the headings ‘Strengthening sustainability criteria for supplier qualification’ and ‘Driving improvements through supplier assessments’).

See also the ethical purchasing code, under the heading ‘Corrective action’.

HR2 Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions taken.

At international level suppliers are checked by the Vodafone Group to ensure compliance with the ethical purchasing code, which contains clauses on the observance of human rights. All major international suppliers are asked to use e-tasc (Electronics - Tool for Accountable Supply Chains) for this purpose. This is an online system which is used to carry out an initial risk assessment, possibly followed by a more detailed self-assessment depending on the outcome.        
In the Netherlands 8 suppliers have performed a self-assessment.

With regard to responsible chain management, Vodafone Netherlands falls under the overarching policy of the Vodafone Group, where virtually all joint purchasing is carried out. The approach for dealing with suppliers who fail to adhere to the code of conduct and ethical purchasing code is characterised by collaboration and improvement. New suppliers are required to comply with our codes from the start of our collaboration. Further information on our policy can be found on the website of the Vodafone Group (under the headings ‘Strengthening sustainability criteria for supplier qualification’ and ‘Driving improvements through supplier assessments’).

See also the ethical purchasing code, under the heading ‘Corrective action’.
See: Building for the future.

HR3 Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained.

Total number of hours: 11 hours
11 employees from the purchasing department have followed an online training programme (duration approx. 1 hour) on the ethical purchasing code. The policy and procedures relating to aspects of human rights formed part of the training.

Non-discrimination
HR4 Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken.

No complaints were received from employees. One complaint was received from a customer. We are currently taking action to amend our procedures as a result of this complaint.

Freedom of association and collective bargaining
HR5 Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights.

Vodafone Netherlands has a statutory works council. It is also possible for Vodafone employees to be members of a trade union. The right of association and the right to collective bargaining are included in the ethical purchasing code for suppliers. 

Child labor
HR6 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the elimination of child labor.

All suppliers are contractually bound to adhere to Vodafone's ethical purchasing code. This code refers to the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Forced and compulsory labor
HR7 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of forced or compulsory labor.

All suppliers are contractually bound to adhere to Vodafone's ethical purchasing code. This code is based, amongst other things, on the internationally recognised social standards of the ILO (International Labour Organisation).

Security practices
HR8 Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization's policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations. N/A
Indigenous rights
HR9 Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions taken. 0

Social: Society

Social: Society
Indicator Comment  
Community
SO1 Nature, scope, and effectiveness of any programs and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities, including entering, operating, and exiting.

See: Building for the future.
Cooperation with third parties is extremely important for the construction and maintenance of our mobile network. When constructing these antennas we work together with other mobile telecommunications providers to reduce inconvenience for local residents as much as possible. In the Netherlands Vodafone has three mobile networks: GSM 900, GSM 1800 and UMTS 2100. These networks now have national coverage. For the 4G network and the expansion of the other networks 102 new locations entered operation last year. However, a large proportion of the 4,515 existing antenna locations have also now been prepared for 4G. Within the mobile operators alliance MoNet (KPN, T-Mobile and Vodafone), Vodafone has contributed to the development of a new safety standard for working around antennas. Agreements have been made on switching off the power to phone masts that are used by several mobile operators if maintenance work is taking place. In addition, Vodafone provides information to municipalities and residents together with the other mobile telecommunications providers, under the MoNet flag. If there are concerns about the installation of an antenna, MoNet organises meetings for residents. When a mobile phone is being used the human body absorbs some of the radio-frequency radiation. In recent years some scientists have suggested that this can have harmful effects. According to bodies such as the UN World Health Organization, the Netherlands Health Council and the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, there is no scientific evidence to support these suggestions. Vodafone participates in international and national scientific research. In the Netherlands we are participating in the COSMOS study, which is being conducted by the IRAS institute of the University of Utrecht. The Electromagnetic Fields Knowledge Platform is the independent link between the scientific community and society in the Netherlands. More information.

Corruption
SO2 Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption.

100% of the business units are analysed for corruption-related risks. The anti-bribery register is maintained by HR; monitoring is performed by the Compliance Office. Persons who are hired by Vodafone for D-band positions (and higher) are screened by Vodafone Corporate Security. With the candidate's consent, his/her social environment, financial situation, political activities, etc. are checked so that there are no surprises later on and to prevent a candidate from being selected who may be susceptible to bribery or similar. Like last year, in 2012 we performed a risk analysis (risk assessment) in relation to corruption risks. In addition, the gift register was changed. Employees can now record gifts via an online tool instead of using an Excel file. An internal awareness campaign was also carried out once again by means of posters and e-mails.

SO3 Percentage of employees trained in organization's anti-corruption policies and procedures.

Online training is available on the subject of corruption and all employees are required to follow this. Code of conduct with zero-tolerance policy relating to bribery. The regulations on giving and receiving (customer) gifts and invitations to events apply to all employees. In 2010 the entire senior management team followed an online training programme on corruption. In addition, in 2011 they received regular information on the amendments to the code of conduct and guidelines. Communications relating to anti-bribery measures were circulated again in 2012. The policy was also amended and a new gift register was implemented.
There is a whistle-blower scheme/speak-up policy for employees who suspect that someone is not adhering to the code of conduct. They can also file a report anonymously. Attention was drawn to this once again in 2012.
The policy was also amended. The registration requirements were changed and a new gift register was implemented. This register is now an online tool in which employees can record the gifts and invitations they receive (or give).

SO4 Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption. No reported incidents of corruption.
Public policy
SO5 Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying. See: Our policy.
The Public Affairs and Regulatory teams are responsible for formulating positions on public matters and coordinating lobbying activities. These teams form part of the Corporate Affairs & Strategy department. See also indicators 4.15, 4.16 and 4.17.
SO6 Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political parties, politicians, and related institutions by country. None
Anti-competitive behavior
SO7 Total number of legal actions for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices and their outcomes.

None in 2012/2013 financial year. The Netherlands Competition Authority (NMa) launched an investigation in December 2011. This investigation is still in progress.

Compliance
SO8 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations. None

Social: Product responsibility

Product responsibility
Indicator Comment  
Customer health and safety
PR1 Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures.

Cooperation with third parties is extremely important for the construction and maintenance of our mobile network. When constructing these antennas we work together with other mobile telecommunications providers to reduce inconvenience for local residents as much as possible. Within the mobile operators alliance MoNet (KPN, T-Mobile and Vodafone), Vodafone has contributed to the development of a new safety standard for working around antennas. Agreements have been made on switching off the power to phone masts that are used by several mobile operators if maintenance work is taking place. In addition, Vodafone provides information to municipalities and residents together with the other mobile telecommunications providers, under the MoNet flag. If there are concerns about the installation of an antenna, MoNet organises meetings for residents. When a mobile phone is being used the human body absorbs some of the radio-frequency radiation. In recent years some scientists have suggested that this can have harmful effects. According to bodies such as the UN World Health Organization, the Netherlands Health Council and the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, there is no scientific evidence to support these suggestions. Vodafone participates in international and national scientific research. In the Netherlands we are participating in the COSMOS study, which is being conducted by the IRAS institute of the University of Utrecht. The Electromagnetic Fields Knowledge Platform is the independent link between the scientific community and society in the Netherlands. More information.

PR2 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services during their life cycle, by type of outcomes. None
Product and service labelling
PR3 Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements.

Mobile phones: 68.6% of all handsets have been provided with an eco-score. This is a sustainability label for phones, which is validated by KPMG and offers transparency in the chain. The eco-score is based on three categories: company values and principles, the life cycle analysis and sustainable design.
The only statutory directives that apply are those in the area of electronic waste. All our customers are informed about the safe and environmentally friendly use of these products via the packaging and manual. Electrical devices can be handed in via the municipal recycling centres that we are supporting via ICT Nederland. Our customers can also hand in mobile phones and tablets to any of our sales outlets. In addition, via http://inruildeals.vodafone.nl/ it is possible for customers to sell their used mobile phone or tablet. Vodafone guarantees that devices that are sold in this way will be processed in accordance with the relevant (WEEE and RoSH) legislation. With regard to electromagnetic radiation, a section on the SAR value is included in the product manual.

PR4 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labeling, by type of outcomes. None
PR5 Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction. See: The easiest place to business, Key figures and results.
We measure the Net Promoter Score and Customer Effort Score in all channels where there is customer contact. Immediately after contact with one of these channels we ask customers to provide feedback. We also have various other processes and systems in place for obtaining customer feedback. Since 2012 there has been a feedback form on our website, for example. All feedback is monitored on an ongoing basis and forms the starting point for improvements. In the area of labelling only the eco-score has been evaluated by customers. Main result: 81% of Vodafone customers are positive or very positive about the eco-score.
Marketing communications
PR6 Programs for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship. See: Approach & promises.
See: Privacy statement.
There are Responsible Marketing Guidelines (this is an internal document).
PR7 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship by type of outcomes. Last year one complaint about Vodafone was upheld by the Advertising Code Committee. This concerned a telephone acquisition campaign that did not make clear that it was a Vodafone acquisition campaign. The telemarketing agency that Vodafone had engaged for this campaign immediately amended the telemarketing script. Vodafone also took appropriate measures to ensure that this cannot happen again in the future.
Customer privacy
PR8 Total number of substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data. There were a couple of complaints from customers whose details had been mistakenly supplied to the telephone directory.
Compliance
PR9 Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services. None
2012 2013 en Vodafone Magazine